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boehner. >> john boehner is a washington lifer and was not the obvious choice to be leading this sort of tea party crafts. nonetheless you can see the tea party phenomenon for the trade -- freight train that it was an elected to be on the train rather than underneath it. speaker boehner campaigned heavily for a number of the tea party freshman andy also you know believe that this presented the republicans and indeed america with a great opportunity. his belief for example was that this would be a perfect run for entitlement reform. if you are are going after entitlement reform ideally you have the bipartisanship specifically at democratic president so they could not walk away from it. and so, he believed that he could leverage the deep conservatism of the tea party. but he has failed to do so and the tea party freshman with whom i have spent a great deal of time and i have spent time with an awful lot of them, liked him personally and found him admirable in the way is a genial ceo but certainly not as there are real leader. that has been implicitly clear throughout the 112 congress. e
, who were in washington. .. >> what they had was not enough. either in benghazi or the overwhelming numbers. frankly, the state department had not given security for personal resources it needed. on that note, let me ask admiral mullen in regards to the specific findings. >> thank you, mr. ambassador, i appreciate that. i do appreciate your leadership throughout this process as well. good afternoon. the board found that the attacks on benghazi were security related. responsibility for the loss of life committee injuries, and damage to u.s. facilities rest completely and solely with the terrorists who conducted the attacks. that does not mean that there are lessons to be learned. the board found that the security posture at the special mission compound was inadequate for the threat environment in benghazi, and in fact, grossly inadequate to deal with the attacks that took place that night. state department bureau that was supporting benghazi had not taken on security is a shared responsibility. so that support the proposed needed was often lacking and let to the working level to res
at the podium. he can second will be eric trager. he is the washington institute's next generation fellow. he is a doctoral candidate at the university of pennsylvania where he completed a dissertation and he is going to give us some special insight into some of the details of mohammed morsi and the muslim brotherhood in the quest to achieve a constitution. and then we have third, i am pleased to introduce a diplomat of the area. he served in egypt for 2005 through 2010. shalom cohen. he has considerable it's aryans with the relationship and the politics we are seeing on the ground today. first we have steve and eric and then shalom cohen, and then we will open up the discussion for your questions and comments. >> good afternoon. it is a tremendous ledger to be back at the washington institute. i feel a a little nervous, i feel like i'm performing for my first grade teacher again. but it is a great pleasure. this is where, as rob pointed out, my career began. also, those of you who know me, this is where my family began. i am sure that many of you in washington can relate to what is going on
diplomatic security spending by $1.3 billion. you know, in washington where too often we see recommendations of blue ribbon panels ignored, delayed, or deferred as they were for a long time even on the 9/11 commission, i think the secretary's swift action underscores how determined she is to apply the lessons of benghazi. clearly, mistakes were made, and we see -- we learned of those yesterday and in very stark terms about the mistakes leading up to the attack. the report makes that very clerks and one of the most candid and important observations was the failure by certain leaders to see the forest through the trees. there were clear warning signs that security situation in libya deteriorated, and going forward, it is important, and i think it's important for all of us to think in terms of going forward, that we need to do better jobs of ensuring a free and open dialogue among ambassadors, their security personnel, and officials in washington where decisions on security staffing levels and funding are made. now, as we draw the lessons, i want to be crystal clear about something else. congre
ii memorial in washington, d.c. this the ceremony includes remarks by the vice chairman of the joint chief. [sirens] ♪ ♪ ♪ ?eet ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ladies and gentlemen, will be delivered by lieutenant colonel. >> our help is in the name of the lord who made help and earth. the souls of the righteous are in the hand of god. those -- be destroyed but the name liveth for ever more. let us pray. almighty god, creator and sustainer, we offer to you endless of thanks thanksgiving and praise today. we reremember a time of great tyranny in our world. we remember world war ii. we also remember those who stood their ground against great tyranny. those who fought here at home and on the battle fronts to ensure that tyranny would not prevail. we thank you that in the hour of need you gave men and women the strength and resolve to stand no matter the cost. may those brave souls who still remain here with us feel today your hand of favor and strength. for those who remain with us today, receive renewed hope and awareness of our gratitude for their bravery and sacrifice. we ask for y
a year ago. construction began in september. >> thank you, jack. george washington was supposed to have said that the most important inauguration was not the first one but the second want to see if we could reaffirm or transfer powers. whether we are republicans or democrats come we are looking forward to this. >> can we have mr. kerry did say something? >> thank you, senator. i am grateful to be here on behalf of the presidential inaugural committee. the partnership we have formed has been terrific and is integral to making sure that the events that we do here and throughout the capital this weekend is functioning in this great moment in our democracy. we are thrilled to have such great partners. they are waiting to help us execute with what the president and vice president want to see. we are grateful to have such strong partners. >> okay, ma'am? >> if you could let us know, this is paid for with housing and senate money, it will cost about 1,200,000 total, which is less than last year. we are coming in under budget, even though it will hold as many peeps best people. >> [inaudible qu
washington to you, thanks to the bank of america. thank you, john, and thank you to your colleagues. you may have gotten cards. we'll be bringing you into the conversation, think about what you're going to ask. without further adieu, we'll bring in bob woodward. mr. woodward? [applause] >> thank you. saving seats with my notes. i'll pick those up. >> which is your chair? >> you get the daddy chair. >> okay, thank you, thank you. >> so the price of politics, which has become a best seller, as all your books do, looked at the last cliff negotiations over the previous grand bargain that didn't quite get over the finish line. what does that teach us about the current cliff negotiations? >> well, it's ground hog day. the question who is playing bill murray? i mean such a repetition. it's the same players at the same seats at the table with the same doctrines, and, so, you know, where this goes, i -- i think anyone who thinks they know is wrong. as you know, they talk about the fiscal cliff. some people say it's a slope. somebody said it was a bungi jump. somebody said it was a skate board trip, d
. there are no awards, there are no commemorative statues, all he has in his offices are pictures of washington and hawaii. that's he humility he showed his entire life. there was no staff there just the two of us. we talked for an hour. i would always remember -- having passed away yesterday, it will be imbedded in my mind. as we left, we both thought about fact we had not been able to sit down and talk like that enough. he professed at that time -- his words -- how lucky he has been his whole life. he said i got at emphysema now. i said, not from smoking. he said, i learn to smoke in the war as a boy. he smoked from 1944 to 1967. he told me he had lung cancer. but they were wrong. they took part of his lung out. he talked about how lucky he had been with surviving what he fought with lung can certification but how lucky he had been his while life, for example, the war. i'm sure people would not reflect on his massive injuries as being lucky. butth but he considered he was lucky to have lived. he had been called upon with three other people, three other soldiers, to cross a river in the dark o
conservative think tanks here in washington has . south carolina. at times playing the good cop, the bad cop, but always -- always trying to work together. and what differences we've had have been sincere, and that's the word i would use about senator demint. he sincerely believes in his cause. he's a -- he sincerely believes in his causes. he's a sincere voice that people in our party look to for leadership and guidance. what he's done over the last four years to build a conservative movement, to get people involved in politics, like marco rubio, who jim helped early on in his primary i just think is going to be a great legacy. from a state point of view, we have lost one of our great champions. but he and debbie, jim and debbie have raised four wonderful children. they got great grandkids, and i know jim is looking forward to staying involved in pushing the conservative cause outside the body. he was an effective voice in the senate, whether you agreed with jim or not. he really did strongly and passionately advocate for his positions and did it very effectively. jim made the republican pa
-- archives here in washington. this is about 20 minutes. >> good evening. i'm the archivist of the united states and is a pleasure to welcome you to the national archives in theater this evening. a special welcome to our friends at c-span and the other media outlets who are with us tonight. we have a lot of special guests in the audience today but i want to single out a special welcome to senator mike reed who is a good friend of the national archives, senator reed from utah. [applause] who himself clerked for a future supreme court justice, judge alito when he was at the u.s. court of appeals on the third circuit. welcome. on monday the constitution of the united states turned 225. tonight's program is one of several that the national archives is presenting this month in celebration of the founding document, signed in philadelphia on september 17, 1787. tonight we are honored to welcome two distinguished guests to explore the past, present and future of united states constitution. our partners for tonight's program in honor of those of the constitution are the federalist society and the
adjourned >> "washington journal" starts at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> you do not always find many newspaper editors embracing this type of reporting. it's not just economics. it is the discomfort that investigative reporting causes in the newsroom. it is about more than economics. it's those people running into complaints of the publisher. and their stories are common over the years. people who are working for the strong upright in that area. >> the pulitzer prize-winning team will take your calls and e-mails and tweets next month on the in depth. they began their collaborative work in the 70s with the co-authors of eight books. the latest, the betrayal of the american dream. watch live at noon eastern on january 6 on c-span2. from the texas book festival american tapestry. the story of the background of michele obama. this is about 45 minutes. >> good evening. welcome. it is a delight to have you here, rachel, and to have all of you here. it's a lovely summer evening, and it is getting hot out there. summer will
, and there are two types of people in washington. those who really enjoy detailed discussion about senate procedure, and those who don't. welcome. i can see which category you fit into. we have a great panel today to discuss something that's become more and more important moving forward, especially in the current nature of congress where the lines seem to be more and more stark and obvious than as any time as i've been in washington. we have four experts discussing the developments in --cepsbly the filibuster, but the discussion will touch on other areas of senate procedure and precedent, and you'll see a distinction between the two, senate rules and senate precedence on the other. you'll hear from four individuals who have a depth of experience in these matters that, i think, is unrivaled in the city. i'll introduce them briefly so they can turn it over to the discussion. i'll lead off with no particular order, james walden speaking first, working in the house of representatives and the senate, serving as the senate hearing committee. he's an adjunct professor in the department of politics in the
at the memorial services for the late hawaii senator daniel inouye today at the washington national cathedral in washington d.c. senator inouye died on monday at the age of 88 and was the second longest-serving senator in history. this is an hour and 45 minutes. .. >> i am resurrection and i am white said the lord. whoever has faith in me shall have lies, and everyone who has lies and has committed himself to me and she shall not die forever. as for me, i know that my redeemer lives and that at the last he will send upon the earth after my awakening, he will raise me up and in my body, i shall see god. i myself shall see in my eyes behold him who is my friend and not a stranger. for none of us have wife and hands of a none terms his own master when we die. for if we have life, we are alive in the lord and if we die, we die in the lord. so then, whether we live or die, we are the worse possession. happy from now on are those who died in the lord, so it is said we spirit, for they rest from their labor. >> as dean of washington national cathedral on behalf of the bishop of washington, i will co
to welcome everyone to george washington university. if i could ask everyone to please turn off their cell phones. as you can see, it's a crowded house. the purpose of this event, and all events, is to examine in some sort of depth the various national security challenges facing the united states, and in the case, not only the united states but also the african continent. when you look at the area of responsibility africom has, it's so-ing, in terms of complexity and geography. many of you are well aware, at least this informed audience, that counterterrorism is still an issue the united states needs to take seriously. i think for some, with respect to africa, came to light with the tragic events in ben georgia circumstance but as general ham well knows, this has been challenging the united states and others for quite some time. the terrorist threat has metastasized. ding-dong, the witch is not dead, referring to osama bin laden. you see threats move and gravitate to un and understood protected areas. obviously al qaeda some the islamic maghreb seems to be on the march. they're spread and
] >> bob samuels -- this working? bob samuels from "the washington post." this is for admiral mullen. i think the proposals of the administration are to reduce the marine corps by 20,000 and the army by 80,000 from their peaks, and there is much speculation that further cuts in the pentagon budget would lead to additional cuts in the both the army and the marines. if the united states was put in the position where it had to occupy and protect the oil fields of the persian gulf for an extended period of time, say five, six years, are those forces adequate to do the job? >> one of the, one of the reasons i at least was able to get through the tour as chairman is try not to speculate too much on hypotheticals. the reductions in both the army and the marine corps have been in the budget now -- i think they're in the '13 budget, so basically they've been on the hill, the beginnings of them, they've been on the hill for the better part of a year, and they are reductions both the chiefs of those two services and the chairman all support. clearly -- and i did as well when i was chairman over a
plus, your e-mails, phone calls and tweets. washington journal, live tuesday, at 7:00 a.m. eastern, on c-span. >> now, latinos and the 2012 election, and what policy issues influenced their vote. speakers included former white house adviser to latin american, soto, and alfonso aguilar.: this is about two hours. [inaudible conversations] s. >> this is i think, as you all know, a place where public policy and research meet. i bring together the world of ideas with the world of policy action. very happy that tim johnson, the director of the latin american program is here this morning. and also want to acknowledge sal low star who had a lot to do with the planning, and this is an event we're cosponsoring with immigration works, to tamar a jacoby, and arizona state university, working on the issues. i want to acknowledge cardenas, a former governor and distinguished mexican colleague and many other good friends. and mane others back at the woodrow wilson system. and dan, who is out of government and into this civilian life. there's no doubt the latino vote was important in this past ele
and prepare for when it comes to actually going over that fiscal cliff if the folks in washington can get their act together? >> well i come from a part of south carolina which has been economically challenged for quite a long time and remains so. certain parts of south color alina have developed pretty strongly about the but the part that i come from both the aqua cultural manufacturing has a high foreclosure rate and people are having a hard time there and i visited there a few times as chairman. so part of the reason that we are engaging in these policies is to try and create a stronger economy, more jobs so folks across the country including places like the one where i grew up will have more opportunity to have a better lifestyle. so it's a jim import and i think it's very important that we not just look at the numbers. we need to look at the unemployment rate and say every tenth means many many people are represented there so it's very important to try to keep in mind the reality of unemployment to foreclosure of weak wage growth etc. so we always try to do that. and i want to, it's
controversial is the most things were. designed washington said he was competition and he submitted a design for a palace. americans aren't having a palace. it was not particularly awe-inspiring. in fact, in 1821, a diplomat told the congress is neither large nor awe-inspiring, but the answer the congressman gave said that building that its purpose if it were larger or more elegant, perhaps some president would be declined to become a permanent resident. >> olympia snowe retiring after serving three terms in the senate. she spoke on the senate floor today for about 40 minutes. >> i rise today with an infinite appreciation for the institution of the united states senate as well is the profound sense of gratitude as i prepare to conclude my 18 years in the senate and may nearly 40 years in elective office on behalf of the people of name. madam president, it's been difficult to envision the day when i would be saying farewell to the senate. just as it was impossible to imagine i would one day become the united states senate rss is growing at a name. but such is the miracle of america that a you
and prior to that you have been living in the states, correct? >> i think in here washington. before i was a deputy minister in the early '90s. >> here in washington you are known as mr. anne applebaum. >> i am proud to be married to and though. c-span: that was seven years ago. >> guest: he was so young. c-span: does he look that young today it is a foreign minister? >> guest: he looks wonderful. c-span: what does it mean that he is now the foreign minister of poland and how does that figure into all of your interest here are? >> guest: it doesn't figure in directly. i have a background of knowledge and sympathy for that region that i wouldn't have otherwise and i think he doesn't influence any direct way. he is not sitting with me in the archives while i'm looking up to see what happened to the film directors in 1947 and he would be too busy to even help me write my book. knowing that region and having lived in it and having this 20 year long connection with it gives me some empathy or some interest in what happened there. c-span: what are the residuals from world war ii and the iron
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19